Why it’s so darn hard to review suspense (but we really want to)

Right. So we know it’s been ages since our last review, but we’ve been busy dealing with some of those personal things that get in the way, like Amanda finding out she’s having a baby and Jody’s baby starting high-school.

Still, we have been reading, maybe even more than we did last year, but we’ve found ourselves in a bit of a sticky situation. We both like reading suspense. Thrillers, crime, whatever you want to call it, although we’d say our preference is more for the gentler, less gory kind. We’re all for the psychological, slow-burn read.

What we don’t like is giving spoilers. So we’re stuck. Do we write a long review and risk giving away too much information? We think not.

Instead, here’s a list of suspense novels we’ve read so far this year in brief:

Jody

Behind Closed Doors & The Breakdown by B.A.Paris: From the first page of both these books I was hooked! The storylines are both psychological suspense and both are fast-paced reads, great for a weekend away (if they don’t scare the bejesus out of you). Behind Closed Doors was quite hard to read in places, so keep that in mind. Overall, they’re both lighter suspense though. Both 5 stars.

Three Hours Late, Hush Little Bird and The Secrets in Silence by Nicole Trope: Aussie author Nicole Trope tends to deal with difficult topics and her books can be quite confronting. Hush Little Baby was particularly hard to read as it dealt with child abuse. I felt like I didn’t want to keep reading but at the same time I had to know how it ended. Nicole writes in a similar style to Caroline Overington so if you’re a Caroline Overington fan you’ll love these.

Hidden Hours by Sara Foster: I devoured all Sara’s previous books at the end of last year and she’s getting better and better! I’m sorry I’ve finished her latest book – I didn’t even pace myself! Normally if I know I’m going to enjoy a book I savour it, read it slowly, will it not to end – but not this one! I just had to know how it ended! I want everyone to know about her so you read her books because I think they’re amazing and she’s a bit of a hidden Aussie gem.

Amanda

The Girl in the Red Coat by Kate Hamer: a fast-paced read told from two perspectives – eight-year-old Carmel who’s been kidnapped by someone she believes to be her estranged grandfather, and her mother Beth, who has to find some way to live day-to-day with a Carmel-shaped hole in her life, all the while believing that she’s out there somewhere. It is not so much a thriller really – you as the reader know where Carmel is, you know what has happened to her. But you want a resolution for all of them. It’s mainly a story about grief, a little girl missing her mother, and a mother missing her little girl. Seeing each other everywhere and never quite connecting. 4 stars.

Storm and Grace by Kathryn Hamer: Australian author Kathryn Harmer has written six books, but this is the first I’ve read. It’s a strange story about male dominance and abuse, saved by the vivid descriptions of freediving and the curious world Heyman creates for her characters. I would love to talk to someone who has read this one! 3 stars.

See What I have Done by Sarah Schmidt: based on the true story of Lizzie Borden, accused of murdering her father and stepmother in 1892 and written by Sarah Schmidt, a new Aussie talent. Eerie and gothic, I read this book quickly over a day or so, finding the cast of characters compelling and oh-so-readable. I was left feeling like more could have been made of it though. 3 stars.

So there you have it. We’re back, and we’ve got other reviews on the boil so look out for them soon!

Hope you are all doing well and reading plenty.

Amanda & Jody

Book Review: All That Is Lost Between Us by Sara Foster

all-that-is-lost-between-us

Hello again! I know it has been a long time between reviews for me (so my colleagues have been reminding me). My problem is I haven’t actually read a book in quite a while; in fact the last book I read was A Promise of Fire by Amanda Bouchet.

While I may not have been reading, that didn’t stop me from buying books only to put them on the book shelf and look at them, much to the amusement of my husband.

So the big question is, what was the book that finally got me reading again? It was the couldn’t-put-down, read-until-my-eyes-couldn’t-stay-open, All That Is Lost Between Us by Sara Foster. Sara is one of Australia’s bestselling psychological suspense authors and in my newly-formed opinion it’s not hard to see why.

All That Is Lost Between Us is a psychological thriller, but at the same time it’s so much more. I think what sets All That Is Lost Between Us apart from other books of this time is the way Sara develops her characters. You get to know each of them and become invested in their stories. At the same time there is a suspenseful undertone to the story, which had me cuddling closer to my pillow as the goosebumps crept up my arms. What I also found amazing was the way Sara completely transported me to the English country side and the wild marsh country. I could almost feel the mist on my arms. While this book might be too light on the suspense part for some readers, it was perfect for me.

Georgia and her family are believable characters with real life worries and normal family dynamics. Georgia, 17, has withdrawn from her family and her cousin Sophia, who is her best friend. Anya, her mother and a counsellor, knows something is wrong but Georgia is always shutting her out and she doesn’t know how to reach her. Georgia’s father is dealing with his own guilt, and when Georgia’s brother Zac discovers what is behind the change in his sister the family reaches crisis point.

In the days since finishing All That Is Lost Between Us, I’ve been scouring the book stores for my next read. However, as Amanda and I have both found, there isn’t too much around at the moment that we’re interested in. My solution to this problem was to start reading Beneath The Shadows another book by Sara Foster and as of last night, or should I say the early hours of the morning, I am totally hooked! In fact I can’t wait till everyone goes to sleep tonight and I get my quiet time so I can finish.

I want to end by saying “Thank you Sara Foster for deciding you wanted to be a writer, I will be forever grateful!”

Jody

P.S

After doing some investigating today I found out Sara has a new book coming out this year, and I can’t wait. The title is The Hidden Hours and it’s out in April in Australia. Lucky I have a couple more of Sara’s books to read before then to keep me happy.

My TBR pile and hitting a reading slump

Well, it’s about time I contributed some content to our blog. I’m sure Amanda is starting to think she’s all alone with no one to help. My problem is I haven’t read anything in a few weeks. I’m really struggling to get excited by a new book and it’s starting to bother me – a lot.

I have books on my shelf I’ve been waiting to read. Some of them I even bought as soon as they were released, but now for some reason they’re just not grabbing me. So, to help me get reading again I decided to share with everyone a selection of books on my TBR pile. There are some great new releases and some old favourites just waiting to be read, and I have no idea why I don’t want to right now. Is anyone else suffering reader’s block?

The Girl in the Glass Tower by Elizabeth Fremantle

I loved the cover of this book so much I had to have it. And when I saw it’s set in Tudor England I was ecstatic because that is one of my favourite time periods. It tells the story of Arbella Stuart, niece to Mary Queen of Queen of Scots and presumed successor to Elizabeth I. She’s been in isolation for most of her life but as we all know, those close to the crown are never safe! I always find it interesting when someone whose life is so strictly controlled suddenly goes against the grain. I am hoping that’s what happens anyway!

The Joyce Girl by Annabel Abbs

I have been watching this book pop up again and again on social media and the premise is fascinating. It’s set in the late 1920s in Paris and it’s about James Joyce’s daughter Lucia. From what I understand, this is a fiction based on the few details known about Lucia’s life, who almost disappeared from history. Despite her talent and ambition she leads a tumultuous life, one that sounds entirely gripping.

America’s First Daughter by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie

Obviously I was going through a bit of an historical fiction phase with these ones! This novel is set in America during the 18th Century, in particular the period when Thomas Jefferson is the American Minister to France. The protagonists are his 15 year old daughter, Patsy, and Sally Hemings, a slave girl of the same age. It’s been compared to Gone with the Wind, which is a big call but in my mind that makes it a must read.

Thunderlord by Marion Zimmer Bradley & Deborah J. Ross

The Darkover series by Marion Zimmer Bradley is one of my all time favourite series. Seriously. I’m always trying to get Amanda to pick these up. I own and have read every book in the series and I’ve enjoyed every one. What makes Marion Zimmer Bradley’s books stand out from others is the depth and nuance of the characters and the way she makes the world of Darkover and the people come to life. Thunderlord is a brand-new novel in the Darkover universe, written by collaborator Deborah J. Ross. Read it! Please! Then you can tell me how good it is and I will be inspired to pick it up!

A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth

I’ve read A Suitable Boy twice in the space of 15 years and thought it was about time to read it again. For a while there I was sure it was going to be the one to get me out of my slump. Some people might find this book a challenge at over 1300 pages but I promise you it really doesn’t seem that long when you are reading it. It’s truly an epic family saga at it’s best – a love story – a story of newly independent India and how Lata’s destiny is intertwined with that of her country.

Last Woman Hanged by Caroline Overington

What do you know…another history book! Australian this time. I’m really going around the world here. Caroline Overington is one of my favourite Australian authors and I’ve read every book she’s written. I was also lucky enough to meet her at an author talk we held at the library. The Last Woman Hanged was a book Caroline spoke passionately about writing and one I know I will enjoy. It’s the story of Louisa Collins, who went through four trials in the 1880’s before being found guilty of killing both her husbands with arsenic. I will never tire of Australian history!

Elianne by Judy Nunn

I’ve read The Ghan and Beneath the Southern Cross by Judy Nunn and I enjoyed both. They’re light reads often with a bit of a serious undertone and this one is set on a sugar cane plantation in Queensland.

I have to admit this is only a small selection of the books at the top of my TBR pile. Surely I should be able to find one here to get me back reading again. If anyone has any suggestions to help me pick up a book again, I’m keen to hear them!

Jody

Book Review: Barbed Wire and Cherry Blossoms by Anita Heiss

Barbed Wire and Cherry Blossoms by Anita Heiss was just the book I needed to get me out of my reading slump! It was such a nice surprise to find it in the book shop. I had no idea Anita Heiss had a new book coming out and I’ve been meaning to read one of her books for a long time. I thought – why not start with the latest one?

Barbed Wire and Cherry Blossoms was a joy to read. I really enjoyed sharing Mary and Hiroshi’s beautiful story. 

5 AUGUST, 1944

Over 1000 Japanese soldiers break out of the No.12 Prisoner of War compound on the fringes of Cowra. In the carnage, hundreds are killed, many are recaptured, and some take their own lives rather than suffer the humiliation of ongoing defeat.

But one soldier, Hiroshi, manages to escape.

At nearby Erambie Station, an Aboriginal mission, Banjo Williams, father of five and proud man of his community, discovers Hiroshi, distraught and on the run. Unlike most of the townsfolk who dislike and distrust the Japanese, the people of Erambie choose compassion and offer Hiroshi refuge. Mary, Banjo’s daughter, is intrigued by the softly spoken stranger, and charged with his care.

For the community, life at Erambie is one of restriction and exclusion – living under Acts of Protection and Assimilation, and always under the ruthless eye of the mission Manager. On top of wartime hardships, families live without basic rights.

Love blossoms between Mary and Hiroshi, and they each dream of a future together. But how long can Hiroshi be hidden safely and their bond kept a secret?

There was so much to enjoy about this book. Mary and Hiroshi’s story was just one part. There was also the insight into the Aboriginal people of the time, how they lived, the attitude towards them and their stories. While I found this all fascinating, I also felt sick to my stomach at the injustice of it all.

I also found it interesting to read about the Japanese people, their culture and involvement in the Second World War.

Barbed Wire and Cherry Blossoms is beautifully woven Australian historical fiction. I felt a huge sense of loss when I read the last page; I just wanted more! Even now days after finishing it I still feel the need to be a part of Mary and the Wiradjuri peoples lives.

I would love for someone else to pick up this book and enjoy it like I did.

Jody

On Primary School Confidential by Mrs Woog

I feel guilty admitting this, but I actually hadn’t heard of Mrs Woog until I listened to a podcast where she was being interviewed. I don’t have any children so I guess that’s as good an excuse as any! Still, I’m glad I listened, and I’m glad I made a quick reservation for her book at the library because I can happily say that now I’m a bit of a fan-girl.

Right from the first page of Private School Confidential, I knew it was going to be a romping great read. For starters it has a down-right Aussie accent. That’s a weird thing to write I know, and it’s not really something I have paid much attention to before. Maybe because I don’t read huge amounts of non-fiction. It was just so clear. It was like talking to a girlfriend on a Friday night at the local pub. I guess it’s that satirical, self-deprecating writing style that immediately makes you sit up and listen:

On the P&C:

The ideal P&C president should have a resume that includes the following; time spent working as a hostage negotiator for the federal police, experience in dealing with trolls on Facebook, previous dealings with the United Nations, at LEAST a brown belt in karate, superior finger-pointing skills… 

On the Kiss and Drop:

The ‘kiss and drop’ – boy that is a game-changer. Once you go there, you will never go back.

On extracurricular activities:

Think back to your own childhood. What did you do after school? I’ll bet it didn’t involve being ferried from pillar to post. Modern parents need to collectively calm the f**k down.

On Public vs. Private School:

None of the extracurricular activities and nice lawns provided by private schools will matter if your kid turns into an entitled pain in the whatsit.

The book is roughly in three parts; Mrs Woog’s experience at primary school growing up in a small town in New South Wales, her later experience as a primary school teacher, particularly in London, and then as a parent of primary school children. She details the ups and downs of school life hilariously, the kids, the mums, the food, the must-have toys. So much so that I found myself reading chapters aloud to my husband, and laughing out loud at the stories that took me back to my own school days, and the realities of working with children every day. There is a bit of a sad irony to much of the humour though, and it does make you reflect on the difficulties our educators must suffer. More respect to them, I say.

The book is a quick read, and broken into nifty little chapters that help you speed through, each anecdote entertaining and revealing. Definitely a must-read for those who work with children, those who have children and those who want them.

Amanda